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Today's News is a service of the Office of News and Information.

901 S. Bond Street
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Baltimore, MD 21231

Phone 443.287.9960 | Fax 443.287.9920 | todaysnews@jhu.edu

New York Times
June 8, 2009
Nutrition: Parents’ Healthy Diet Has Little Influence
Johns Hopkins angle: Report on research by Youfa Wang of the School of Public Health, which found that parents' eating habits had little impact on their children's dietary choices and preferences.

New York Times
June 8, 2009
Opening Doors on the Way to a Personal Robot
Johns Hopkins angle: A feature story about personal robots mentions The Beast, a robot built at Johns Hopkins University in the mid-1960s which was able to locate standard wall sockets to refuel.

CNN.com
June 8, 2009
Obama's Kenyan gran living in spotlight
Johns Hopkins angle: CNN producer Linda Roth traveled to Kenya with a dozen U.S. journalists on a trip to see President Obama's grandmother. The journey was set up through the Gatekeeper Editor's program with the International Reporting Project at SAIS.

ABC NEWS
June 9, 2009
'Shock' Over Retirees' Alleged Spying for Cuba
Johns Hopkins angle: This article mentions that Kendall Myers, accused of spying for Cuba, pursued his master's degree and doctorate from Johns Hopkins and later became an adjunct professor of European studies at SAIS.

Aberdeen American News (S.D.)
June 9, 2009
SPIES IN ABERDEEN?
Johns Hopkins angle: This article about accused spy Kendall Myers quotes David P. Calleo, director of European studies at SAIS, and mentions that Myers earned his doctorate in European history from SAIS.

Investor’s Business Daily
June 8, 2009
Spy Case Keeps Cuba In Perspective
Johns Hopkins angle: This article about accused spy Kendall Myers mentions that he taught United States-United Kingdom relations at Johns Hopkins.

The Daily Beast
June 9, 2009
My Professor, the Spy
Johns Hopkins angle: A column by Tom Murray, a former student of Walter K. Myers, an adjunct professor at SAIS who is accused of spying for Cuba.

Baltimore Sun
June 9, 2009
Correction: Cuba Spies-Damage story
Johns Hopkins angle: Associated Press correction states that accused spy Walter K. Myers was an associate professor at Johns Hopkins in the early 1970s. He then became an adjunct professor in the late 1970s and held that position ever since. (In fact, Myers was an assistant professor in the early 1970s.)

The News-Press (Fort Myers, Fla.)
June 9, 2009
School Briefs
Johns Hopkins angle: This news item notes that six Lee County public high schools have been selected to participate in a national Algebra 1 Study conducted by researchers at the Krieger School’s Center for Social Organization of Schools.

Athens Banner-Herald (Ga.)
June 8, 2009
Library a great place to plug kids' summer brain drain
Johns Hopkins angle: This article refers to research cited by the National Center for Summer Learning at Johns Hopkins University.

Caspar Star Tribune (Wyo.)
June 9, 2009
Help your children be summer readers
Johns Hopkins angle: Feature cites a November 2002 report from Johns Hopkins Center for Summer Learning offering strategies to combat "summer brain drain."

Lancaster Online
June 9, 2009
Kindle has writers questioning future of publishing
Johns Hopkins angle: Piece quotes Lancaster author Libby Sternberg, who has a degree in voice from Peabody Conservatory.

Baltimore Sun
June 9, 2009
New Wilmer building boosts eye research
Johns Hopkins angle: Coverage of the opening of the Robert H. and Clarice Smith Building, named for its lead donors, contains a first-floor surgical pavilion with six ophthalmic operating rooms that will enable Hopkins surgeons to perform 50 percent more procedures each day. The piece quotes Edward Miller, dean of the medical faculty at the Johns Hopkins University and chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Baltimore Business Journal
June 8, 2009
New Wilmer Eye Institute to open in August
Johns Hopkins angle: This article reports that Johns Hopkins' new Wilmer Eye Institute will begin accepting patients in August.

The Washington Post
June 9, 2009
Peanuts, Anyone?
Johns Hopkins angle: This article examining experimental treatments for food allergies, quotes Robert A. Wood, chief of pediatric allergy and immunology at Johns Hopkins, who led a study on the subject at the Hopkins Children's Center in Baltimore.

The Washington Post
June 9, 2009
Like Them or Not, I Must Eat Peanuts
Johns Hopkins angle: This first person piece by a teenager cites Johns Hopkins Medical Center.

The Washington Post
June 9, 2009
Mainstream Physicians Give Alternatives a Try
Johns Hopkins angle: An increasing number of institutions, including Johns Hopkins Hospital, have established units to bring together conventional and alternative approaches to care, according to this article.

Baltimore Business Journal
June 8, 29009
Johns Hopkins Medicine taps Winkenwerder to help win federal contracts
Johns Hopkins angle: This brief reports that the Virginia consulting firm will help Johns Hopkins design and promote programs that increase healthful behaviors and improve patient safety.

Maryland Daily Record
June 9, 2009
Regional Perspectives: Seeking justice in transportation plans
Johns Hopkins angle: This article mentions that the School of Public Health was a partner in a study looking at transportation and environmental justice.

New Kerala (India)
June 9, 2009
Foetuses with Down's syndrome express some genes differently
Johns Hopkins angle: This ANI wire story about Tufts Medical Center research includes comments from Roger Reeves, a professor of physiology in JHU’s School of Medicine.

New Scientist (U.K.)
June 8, 2008
Oxidative stress may be to blame for Down's symptoms
Johns Hopkins angle: This article about Tufts Medical Center research includes comments from Roger Reeves, a professor of physiology in JHU’s School of Medicine.

Daily India
June 9, 2009
Foetuses with Down's syndrome express some genes differently
Johns Hopkins angle: Roger Reeves of the School of Medicine commented in this ANI story on research into Down syndrome.

Worcester Telegram and Gazette (Mass.)
June 8, 2009
Sadness amid joy
Johns Hopkins angle: This article about the University of Massachusetts Medical School commencement ceremony notes that Ben Carson, a School of Medicine professor and director of pediatric neurosurgery, was a commencement speaker and received an honorary degree.

San Gabriel Valley Tribune
June 8, 2009
Hemispherectomy patients gather for fun and support
Johns Hopkins angle: This feature about a regional picnic for hemispherectomy families mentions that a national hemispherectomy reunion, sponsored by the John M. Freeman Epilepsy Center at Johns Hopkins Medical School and Hospital, has taken place every three years for the past 12 years.

Tehran Times
June 10, 2009
Who influences kids' eating habits?
Johns Hopkins angle: WebMd story reports on research by Youfa Wang and colleagues at the SoPH which reveals that parents' eating habits have limited impact on their children's.

AIDSMap
June 8, 2009
Hepatitis B hasn’t gone away – and may come back
Johns Hopkins angle: David Thomas of the School of Medicine told specialists at a conference that patients co-infected with HIV and hepatitis B had an annual mortality rate due to liver disease of 1.4 percent; in contrast in people with HIV alone annual liver-related mortality was 0.17 percent and in people with hepatitis B alone 0.08 percent.

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HIGHER EDUCATION NEWS
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Chronicle of Higher Education
June 9, 2009
NIH Is Deluged With 21,000 Grant Applications for Stimulus Funds
National Institutes of Health officials said they were both thrilled and overwhelmed at the prospect of evaluating the proposals and distributing the money.

Chronicle of Higher Education
June 9, 2009
Colleges Offer a Degree in 3
At most institutions, the three-year degree and its benefits are available to only a sliver of the total student population - in most cases only the very best and most driven students. That makes the three-year degree an unlikely solution for the overall problem of rising college costs. And some educators question whether students should barrel through college at an accelerated clip, even if they can.

Associated Press
June 9, 2009
Economy forces 2009 grads to dump dream colleges
The wretched economy has taught many of the nation's college-bound seniors a hard lesson: You can't always get what you want. A survey to be released today by the National Association for College Admission Counseling finds that 71 percent of high schools reported that more of their students are forgoing their "dream schools" this year than in previous years. And there is little doubt money is a big reason.

Inside Higher Ed
June 9, 2009
Economic Realities and Admissions
While this year's admissions cycle may not be truly over until new students show up in the fall, many high schools and colleges can now see clear trends. Not surprisingly, the economy is having a real impact on student choices and behavior, according to a study released today by the National Association for College Admission Counseling.

Chronicle of Higher Education
June 9, 2009
Financial Guru Identifies Higher Education's Winners and Losers
At a forum for college leaders in Washington, Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Economy.com, predicted that well-financed public universities with a strong "brand" could come out ahead.

New York Times
June 9, 2009
An Ivy-Covered Path to the Supreme Court
The majority of recent Supreme Court justices have been educated at an Ivy League institution, and critics suggest that contributes to a kind of high-level groupthink.

Associated Press
June 9, 2009
Pulling malaria from mosquitoes to fight disease
The story talks about research being conducted at the University of Maryland to create a malaria vaccine out of living malaria parasites lurking in mosquitoes' salivary glands. Researchers there are also creating mutant mosquitoes that could become super malaria incubators, a bid to eventually get more of the vaccine's key ingredient per mosquito.

Inside Higher Ed
June 9, 2009
Summer Flu, Fall Headaches?
Summer's here, but swine flu is still spreading on college campuses. According to one expert, this could forebode even more cases -- and unexpected strain on health centers -- in the fall.

Associated Press
June 9, 2009
Egypt: 5 more Americans test positive to swine flu
Another four students and a faculty member at the American University in Cairo have contracted swine flu, said Egypt's health minister, bringing the total number of those infected at the school to seven.

Inside Higher Ed
June 9, 2009
Survival Tactics
As N.C. State chancellor resigns amid controversy, several other besieged college leaders hold on. So how do presidents persevere in scandal or avoid it altogether?

Inside Higher Ed
June 9, 2009
The Best University?
Peer evaluations filled out by Clemson's top officials partially back contention that they didn't conspire to game U.S. News rankings. But Clemson’s president ranked the university's undergraduate program higher than Harvard and Berkeley.

Inside Higher Ed
June 9, 2009
Gaming the Rankings - Opinion
The U.S. News frenzy is about how to succeed without really succeeding, but is probably here to stay, write Burton A. Weisbrod, an economist at Northwestern University, and Evelyn D. Asch, a researcher at Northwestern’s Institute for Policy Research.

Inside Higher Ed
June 9, 2009
The Summer Swarm
Community colleges and for-profit universities are seeing expected enrollment increases due to the down economy, but students are flocking to many four-year colleges this summer, too -- and finding friendlier aid policies at some institutions.

Johns Hopkins University