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Today's News is a service of the Office of News and Information.

901 S. Bond Street
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Baltimore, MD 21231

Phone 443.287.9960 | Fax 443.287.9920 | todaysnews@jhu.edu

USA Today
July 30, 2009
Americans spend $34 billion a year on alternative medicine
Johns Hopkins angle: This feature includes comments from Linda Lee, an assistant professor of gastroenterology in the School of Medicine and director of the Johns Hopkins Integrative Medicine & Digestive Center.

Maryland Daily Record
July 31, 2009
Nonprofits step up in times of crisis
Johns Hopkins angle: This column mentions that the Johns Hopkins Center for Event Preparedness and Response, the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine were among the hosts of a summit of Maryland leaders from business, government and nonprofit organizations to come up with ways to better prepare for public health and safety crises.

Minnesota Public Radio
July 30, 2009
Cell phones and the hazards of driving while chatting
Johns Hopkins angle: Krieger School psychologist Steven Yantis talks about the dangers of chatting on cellular telephones while driving.

ABC2.com (WMAR-TV Channel 2 – Baltimore)
July 31, 2009
Dixon's Legal Issues Could Pose Election Problems
Johns Hopkins angle: This TV news report includes comments from Matthew Crenson, a Krieger School professor emeritus of political science. An online video version of the story is posted next to the article.

ScientificAmerican.com
July 30, 2009
Rise 'n Die, HIV: Strategies for a Cure Based on Waking the AIDS Virus
Johns Hopkins angle: This article quotes Robert Siliciano, a School of Medicine professor who studies the dynamics of HIV replication.

U.S. News & World Report Online
July 30, 2009
Pregnant Women Will Be Included in H1N1 Flu Vaccine Trials
Johns Hopkins angle: This women’s health blog includes comments from Ruth Faden, director of JHU’s Berman Institute of Bioethics.

Science News
July 24, 2009
Rotation may solve cosmic mystery
Johns Hopkins angle: This article contains information from Rosemary Wyse, a Krieger School professor of physics and astronomy.

MSN Money (Associated Press)
July 31, 2009
NY taxpayers to pay donors for stem cell studies
Johns Hopkins angle: Debra Mathews of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics is quoted in this story that reports that women who donate their eggs for stem cell studies will be paid up to $10,000 from taxpayers' money.

INO.com
July 31, 2009
NY taxpayers to pay donors for stem cell studies
Johns Hopkins angle: This Associated Press wire story includes comments from Debra Mathews of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics.

The Oregonian
July 31, 2009
In sickness and in health, Americans increasingly trust in psychiatric meds
Johns Hopkins angle: Ramin Mojtabai, an associate professor in the Department of Mental Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, is quoted in this story about research that reveals Americans' increasing acceptance of psychiatric medicines.

HealthDay
July 31, 2009
Psych Drugs Gaining Widespread Acceptance
Johns Hopkins angle: This article reports on new research led by Ramin Mojtabai, an associate professor in the Department of Mental Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health.

AllAfrica.com
July 31, 2009
Zimbabwe: Consumers Short-Changed
Johns Hopkins angle: This article includes quotes from Steve Hanke, a WSE professor of applied economics.

HealthDay
July 30, 2009
Birth Control May Help Ward Off Bacterial Vaginosis
Johns Hopkins angle: This story includes comments from the study’s senior author, Emily Erbelding, an associate professor of infectious diseases who is based at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.

Baltimore Sun
July 31, 2009
Pesticides harming Chesapeake Bay, experts warn
Johns Hopkins angle: This story noted that the Pesticides and the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Project is a partnership between the Maryland Pesticides Network and the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.

Baltimore Sun
July 31, 2009
From grief to an idea
Johns Hopkins angle: Feature story mentions Hunter Young, a physician at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Gadsden Times
July 31, 2009
Treating Patients as Partners, by Way of Informed Consent
Johns Hopkins angle: This New York Times piece quotes Timothy M. Pawlik of the School of Medicine.

Sacramento Bee
July 31, 2009
Math students hear about secret codes at UC Davis
Johns Hopkins angle: This article concerns a lecture delivered by David Perry, a U.S. Department of Defense cryptologist who teaches a summer cryptology course for teens in JHU’s Center for Talented Youth program.

Thousand Oaks Acorn (California)
July 30, 2009
Spaghetti bridge testing its strength
Johns Hopkins angle: This news brief describes a spaghetti bridge competition on the campus of California Lutheran University, an event that was part of WSE’s Engineering Innovation for High School Students program.

Brick Township Bulletin (New Jersey)
July 30, 2009
Business Briefs
Johns Hopkins angle: This news item mentions that Richard J. Scott, who has been appointed senior vice president of clinical effectiveness and medical affairs for Meridian Health, received his undergraduate degree from Johns Hopkins.

Maryland Daily Record
July 31, 2009
On The Move - Business Edition
Johns Hopkins angle: This brief states that Dr. Sanjay Jagannath has joined the medical staff of The Institute for Digestive Health and Liver Disease at Mercy Medical Center. Jagannath previously served as assistant professor of medicine, director of endoscopic ultrasound, director of the Pancreatitis Center and program director for the Advanced Therapeutic Endoscopy Fellowship at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Baltimore Sun
July 31, 2009
Sports Digest
Johns Hopkins angle: College fencing: Johns Hopkins named Austin Young women's coach and said he will continue as men's coach.


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HIGHER EDUCATION NEWS
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Chronicle of Higher Education
July 31, 2009
Foreign-Student Enrollments Are Likely to Climb, but Trouble May Lie Ahead
Despite economic turmoil worldwide, the number of international students coming to the U.S. this fall is likely to show a modest increase, according to colleges contacted by The Chronicle and U.S. Department of State visa figures. Still, some international educators fear that shrinking budgets could reduce the amount of money for graduate-student stipends and that depleted savings could leave overseas families unable to afford American college tuition.

Chronicle of Higher Education
July 31, 2009
Senate Panel Approves Spending Bill With Increases for Student Aid
The bill is the same as one approved by an appropriations subcommittee this week and largely mirrors a version passed by the House of Representatives last week. The House version, however, included more money for TRIO and Gear Up, and a bigger increase for the NIH, which is the largest single source of funds for academic research.

Inside Higher Ed
July 31, 2009
The Real Costs of Merit Aid
New study finds that 10 years after offering non-need-based assistance private colleges are likely to enroll fewer Pell Grant recipients and fewer black students.

Inside Higher Ed
July 31, 2009
Green Ideas
In the 1800s, Middlebury College freshmen were instructed to pack a cord of wood for their dormitory fireplaces. "We've kind of got the modern version of that," said Jack Byrne, the director of sustainability integration. The updated version is a $12 million modern fireplace -- although it's more akin to a high-tech wood stove. (Inside Higher Ed's "Green Ideas" spotlights different strategies, large and small, that colleges are adopting in attempts to reduce their environmental impact.)

Baltimore Sun
July 31, 2009
Brown's departure from Morgan raises issues
Some say Morgan State University decided not to renew Denise Brown's contract as adviser to the student newspaper after editorials criticized administrators.

Washington Post
July 31, 2009
Va. Tech Engineers Develop Vehicle for Blind Drivers
A team of Virginia Tech engineers say they have developed the first vehicle that can be independently operated by a blind driver. The modified dirt buggy gets its first public test Friday morning at the University of Maryland, where a group of blind youths will take test drives on a campus course.

Washington Post
July 31, 2009
Business Is Brisk for Teacher Training Alternatives
The high unemployment rate has provided an unexpected boon for the nation's public schools: legions of career-switchers eager to become teachers. Across the country, interest in teacher preparation programs geared toward job-changers is rising sharply.

Chronicle of Higher Education
July 27, 2009
Summer Programs Heighten High-School Students' Aspirations
A handful of colleges have programs designed to motivate low-income students to scale the heights of higher education.

Johns Hopkins University