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Summer 2009
VolumeVII, Issue 2

JHNursing Cover Summer 2009
Cover Illustration by
Whitney Sherman

Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing | News and Events | News |

 

 

On the Pulse
News from Around the School and Hospital

Hopkins Nurses Go To Washington

On Capitol Hill

What's the Violence-Depression Connection?

Book Review: Saving Lives

2009 Graduates Becomes Hopkins Nurses

Fan or Follower?

All in the Family

A World of Thanks

Real Talk 4 Girls

Long After Cancer

Faculty, Student, and Staff News

Hopkins Nurses Go To Washington

Nancy_GlassNurse researchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing are briefing legislators, meeting with policy makers, and impacting decisions on Capitol Hill.  
 
Associate Professor Nancy Glass, PhD, MPH, RN, brought her perspective as a nurse clinician, researcher, educator, and cross-discipline bridge builder to a “Science in the Service of the Nation” forum held recently at the National Press Club.  The forum, sponsored by Research!America (R!A), focused on America’s global image, economy, and health.   Glass, a R!A Global Ambassador and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health, participated in the America’s Global Image panel with other U.S. global health experts. 
 
Dean Martha N. Hill, PhD, RN, FAAN joined Glass at the forum and also met with health care research leaders from throughout the nation at the Annual Meeting of Research!America. As Vice-Chair elect of R!A, Hill and her fellow officers and Board members use this alliance for discoveries in health to advocate for medical and health research funding and public awareness of the benefits of such research.  
 
On the same day as the R!A forum, members of Congress had yet another opportunity to meet a Hopkins Nurse.  Phyllis Sharps, PhD, RN, FAAN, Chair of the JHUSON Department of Community and Public Health, was an invited presenter at a Capitol Hill Democratic Women’s Working Group roundtable. Hosted by Speaker Pelosi, the roundtable discussed accomplishments of the 111th Congress on behalf of women. Sharps and women economists, business leaders, and advocates shared observations and real-life anecdotes concerning the impact of today’s economy and how specific benefits in the Congressional recovery legislation will aid women and their families.  
 
According to Dean Hill, “Hopkins Nurses are doing a new take on the Mr. Smith Goes to Washington story.  Our research, global health advocacy and community public health nursing are being recognized as a model and allowing us to influence the health care decisions and policy-making both nationally and globally.”
   
 
—Lynn Schultz-Writsel


On Capitol Hill

Ellen-Marie Whelan, PhD, RN, left her faculty position at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in 2003 to pursue a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship, where she served as a legislative aide to Democratic Senate Leader Tom Daschle (D-SD). For the next four years she worked as staff director for the Subcommittee on Retirement and Aging to the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions with Senator Barbara A Mikulski (D-MD). Today, she is a Senior Health Policy Analyst and Associate Director of Health Policy at the Center for American Progress.

Deborah Trautman, PhD, RN, has served as the Vice President of Patient Care Services for the Hopkins-affiliated Howard County General Hospital, Director of Nursing for Emergency Medicine at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and held a Joint Appointment at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Her 2007-2008 Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship led her to the office of Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

—Kelly Brooks-Staub


What's the Violence-Depression Connection?

Health care workers, including nurses, are particularly vulnerable to bullying and verbal abuse, which can lead to devastating emotional trauma and depression.
 
According to recent nursing graduate Callie Vincent ’09, however, this psychological workplace violence doesn’t necessarily cause the depression. Instead, depression experienced by nurses may actually be a predictor of such violence.
 
“Health care professionals are one of the professions most affected by [workplace violence],” said Jacquelyn Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN, Vincent’s advisor for the study. “So we need to think about how we go about preventing that.” 

Callie_Vincent

Callie Vincent '09 studied depression and
workplace violence experienced by
Hopkins nurses.

Vincent’s research was funded by her Provost’s Undergraduate Research Award, given twice a year to allow Johns Hopkins undergraduates a chance to develop research skills. She was among 51 recipients in 2008, joining the ranks of other past School of Nursing students who have also conducted research funded by this award.
 
Using data from an ongoing Safe At Work study, led by Campbell, Vincent analyzed questionnaires taken in summer 2007 from 1,623 nursing staff at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, and Howard County General Hospital. The questionnaires examined the type of violence experienced and measured depression using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Short Depression scale.
 
The results were surprising. 
 
Vincent initially expected depression would be an outcome of the violence, but instead found it was a predictor for the violence.
 
Nursing staff who were depressed when they were first interviewed were nine times more likely to be depressed at a follow up sur-vey. Of the 20 people who were depressed at the time of the follow up questionnaire, 65 percent had reported depression in the first survey. 
 
“So many of the people who experience workplace violence started out depressed,” Vincent said. “They could be more at risk [for violence].”
 
The findings could mean that depressed staff may be more of a target for psychological violence, or that those who are depressed view certain situations more negatively, Vincent said.
 
Vincent’s study also examined other variables that could contribute to
depression, such as experiences with interpersonal violence or child abuse. These data are important to know when developing mental health services for nurses, Campbell said.
 
“She got a lot of interesting results, important results, that need to be looked at further and communicated with the field,” she said.
 
The PURA program not only allowed Vincent to make a significant contribution to this area of research, but it also gave Vincent a chance to experience the challenges and joys of research—which Campbell hopes will compel Vincent to pursue her doctoral degree.
 
With more research, these findings could lead to a greater focus on overall mental health services, Vincent said. 
 
“The point of intervention may not necessarily be at the final step of workplace violence occurring,” she said. “We may need to focus on making sure employees have good mental health to begin with.”

—Sara Michael



 

 Book Review: Saving Lives

SavingLives

Saving Lives: Why the Media’s Portrayal of Nurses Puts Us All at Risk is a wake-up call for nurses: we should be more invested in our profession and challenge those who try to demean it. Written by Hopkins Nursing alumna Sandy Summers, MSN ’02, and her husband Harry J. Summers, Saving Lives is an interesting and conscience-raising work which should be mandatory reading for all nursing students and nurses.  
 
The authors point out the many nurses whose work, both as individual practitioners and as researchers, have made a difference in the care of patients. Yet this very real work is basically overlooked by the mainstream media. The image they provide of nursing is either as in the stereotype of angels of mercy or quite negative, as in the protrayal of Nurse Ratched in the film One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. These ideas about our profession figure in the public perception of what nursing is and what it is not.
 
Take, for example, how poorly most television shows treat nurses when they depict them as little more than handmaidens of physicians. The Saving Lives authors persuasively argue that these shows, most notably House, denigrate the work of nurses and give the public a very jaded idea of what constitutes nursing care. Many television shows depict all health care as being performed by all-knowing physicians. Nurses, however, are noticeable in their absence. That is simply outrageous, especially given that RNs by far constitute the greatest number of health care providers.   
 
Though the authors argue that negative media images hurt the nursing profession—and in turn worsen the nursing shortage—research shows that this may not be the case. Gallup polls consistently identify nurses as the most respected of all professionals. And in 2007, Dr. Peter Buerhaus, PhD found that people who watched popular television shows were as likely as those who saw shows about nurses helping out in disasters to recommend nursing as a positive career choice.  
 
But no matter how media affect popular opinion, it remains obvious that nurses need to be on the frontlines of health care reform and demand to be heard regarding standards. One way to do this is to become experts in dealing with the media and be quoted more frequently in the popular press. This would help ensure that the general public receives a better idea of what nurses do, the clinical expertise they possess, and the educational requirements of the profession.  
 
The positive ideas suggested in Saving Lives can certainly be utilized by nursing leaders in dealing with the press. For example, nurses always need to be identified by their title as RN as well as by their educational credentials. Though Saving Lives identifies some ways to begin to have nurses and their thoughts more widely utilized by the media, the book really could give more of a step-by-step primer to promote the expertise of nurses.  
 
The Summers duo has certainly given nurses and producers a lot to think about in terms of the way the media portrays nurses and how it affects the minds of the public. In the end, Saving Lives can only help nurses find their voice and bring more positive media coverage for ourselves.

—Rosemary Mortimer, MS Ed, MS, RN, CCBE



2009 Graduates Become Hopkins Nurses

GraduationAmidst the shouts, cheers, clapping, and even tears of joy, 105 undergraduate and 78 graduate students walked across the stage at the Lyric Opera House to receive their diplomas at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing 2009 commencement ceremony on May 21st. An additional 142 undergraduate students in the accelerated class graduated in a separate ceremony in July on the Homewood Campus.   
 
Mary Woolley, president of Research!America and keynote speaker at the May ceremony, urged the graduates to be both a nurse and an advocate for nursing, saying that “the truth doesn’t speak for itself,” and added that advocacy is the key to getting more research and funding to advance the science of nursing.  
 
GraduationFaculty members Laura Taylor and Shirley Van Zandt were honored during the ceremony as they were named the 2009 recipients of the Johns Hopkins University Alumni Association Excellence in Teaching Awards. 
 
The day before graduation was special as well, with 78 students inducted into Sigma Theta Tau, the International Honor Society of Nursing.  
 
Find out more about the graduation festivities, including the names of students who received special awards and recognition and the first ever live webcast of an SON graduation ceremony at www.nursing.jhu.edu/graduation.

—Diana Schulin


Fan or Follower?

fanpageFan, friend, groupie, follower.  Whatever you call your online buddies, social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter offer a fun and easy way to reach out and connect.  The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing has launched its first social network media venues, and invites you to join these online communities.

Facebook: Become a Fan
Visit www.facebook.com and search for “Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.” Become a fan of the page to receive news feeds from the School’s website, highlights of articles from the John Hopkins Nursing magazine, and info on special events throughout the year.   
 
Search instead for “Johns Hopkins Nursing magazine” to comment on the latest magazine, make suggestions for future issues, and receive updates on the publication.

Follow Our Tweets
In another new social media venue, the School is sharing brief (up to 140 characters) online text-based messages with those who sign up as “followers.” Hopkins Nursing “Tweets” can be received by visiting www.nursing.jhu.edu/newsevents/ and clicking on the Twitter icon. Or go to www.twitter.com and search for “JHUNursing.”
 
With an estimated community of more than 200 million people on Facebook and 4-6 million active Twitter users, these new online tools offer a global forum to connect with friends and colleagues, prospective and current students, and alumni of the School.

—KBS

All in the Family

MaryPlumb_and_SusanCooleyKing“I have two women to look up to who influenced me to become a nurse,” says Mary Plumb, accelerated ’09.  In her family, nursing is a legacy. 
 
Plumb’s mother, Susan Cooley King, is a nurse and new member of the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Advisory Council. And Plumb’s grandmother, King’s mother, is Louise Thomas Cooley, a Hopkins Nurse from the class of 1947.
 
“My mother, and now my daughter, are both Hopkins nurses,” boasts King, who describes herself as ‘just’ a nurse.  She is used to the teasing from Cooley, her mother, who tells her “You might be a nurse but you’re not a Hopkins Nurse!” 

—KBS


A World of Thanks

Daniels_and_PinkardIn honor of his active involvement with the University’s Knowledge for the World campaign, Walter (Wally) D. Pinkard, Jr. received a crystal globe from Ronald J. Daniels, new president of Johns Hopkins University. The gift was presented at the semi-annual meeting of the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Advisory Council, which Pinkard has chaired since 1998. The school achieved $55.2 million for the campaign.

See inside back cover for full listing of Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Advisory Council.


Real Talk 4 Girls

Real_talkEast Baltimore middle school students held a discussion entitled “Video Vixen,” in which they deconstructed images of women in film, music videos, and television and their affect on teenage girls. The session was part of Real Talk 4 Girls, a one-day conference sponsored by The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the Baltimore Curriculum Project, where girls had the opportunity to talk about health and other issues that affect self-esteem, behavior, interpersonal relationships, and academic performance.  
 
“It was an empowering event for these girls,” says assistant professor Jodi Shaefer, PhD, RN. “We hope to help them achieve their highest potential by addressing the social and psychological challenges of adolescence.”


Long After Cancer

EdenStotsky

Eden Stotsky '09 (r) with childhood friend Traci Kodeck
at Camp Sunrise, a pediatric oncology camp where they
have volunteered together the past 10 years.

At one of the lowest points in her life—waking up from a colonoscopy to be told that she had stage III rectal cancer—Eden Stotsky ’09 remembers that Johns Hopkins nurses were there for her.
 
“I had an amazing medical team,” says Stotsky, who was 26 at the time. “I still, to this day, remember the nurses who took care of me. I have become best friends with one of the nurses, and I’m still friendly with some of the others.”
 
In fact, this summer —at one of the best points in Stotsky’s life—those same Hopkins nurses were there. Stotsky got married June 13th, and her nurse-friends cried and danced and reveled in her happiness.
 
They had good reasons.
 
Stotsky, who was marrying the love of her life, was now going on 12 years cancer-free. And just a few weeks earlier, she had made another life change: She became a Hopkins nurse.
 
“Slowly but surely, over time, I realized that nursing is my calling,” she says. “Nothing is a better fit for me.”
 
Stotsky’s survivorship story is so awe-inspiring, her journey is the subject of a new documentary, produced by the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults. The film, “Long After Cancer: An Insider’s Look at a Survivor’s Story,” is aimed at young people with cancer. It chronicles Stotsky’s low points and courageous moments, her uncertainty and hopefulness. She talks about exhaustion and nausea, but in just about every shot, Stotsky is smiling.
 
“I watch it sometimes, and I don’t even believe it’s my story,” says Stotsky. “It brings happy tears to my eyes. I hope it’s encouraging to other young adults that there is life after cancer—and not just immediately after cancer, but long after cancer.”
 
Stotsky, who was a program coordinator for the Office of Faculty, Staff and Retiree Pro-grams at the Johns Hopkins University when she was diag-nosed in 1997, exuded a refreshing optimism about her disease even from the very beginning.
 
She credits her medical team for modeling that kind of confidence.
 
“I never heard ‘You’re not going to survive this,’” Stotsky says. “I was told, ‘You’re so lucky. You really caught this in the eleventh hour. You’re very fortunate.’” 
 
In 2002, Stotsky became a health educator/patient advocate for the Johns Hopkins Colon Cancer Center. In that job, she was able to do what was done for her—comfort and reassure patients.
 
As a recent nursing school graduate, her new job description still is being worked out, but Stotsky plans to maintain her role at the center and also be a nurse in the division of surgical oncology.
 
“I had the personal experience, and now I have the professional experience. I’m hoping I can marry the two to provide the best care possible to cancer patients and their families, to help them navigate their own journey and make it as manageable as possible,” she says. “Before I went to nursing school, I was missing that clinical piece. Now I feel like it has all come together.”       

—Tanika Davis

Long After Cancer can be viewed on the Ulman Cancer Fund’s website at www.ulmanfund.org.



Faculty, Student, and Staff News

Acute and Chronic Care Faculty

Rosemary_Mortimer

Rosemary Mortimer

Rosemary Mortimer, MEd, MSN, RN received the 2009 Leader of Leaders Award from the National Student Nurses’ Association. 
 
Marie Nolan, PhD, MPH, RN will be inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing this November. 
 
Linda Rose, PhD, RN was named Director of the Society for Education and Research in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing (SERPN), a division of the International Society of Psychiatric Nursing (ISPN).
 
Jennifer Wenzel, PhD, RN, CCM was awarded a $729,000 Mentored Research Scholar Grant from the American Cancer Society to help rural African American elders obtain quality care for cancer.

Sharps

Carm Dorsey, Patty Wilson, Phyllis
Sharps, and Linda Whitner

Community Public Health Faculty
Nancy Glass, PhD, MPH, RN will be inducted as a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing this November. She also received the Urban Health Institute’s Faculty Community Grant to help victims of domestic violence.
 
Elizabeth (Betty) Jordan, DNSc, RN, RNC and Shirley Van Zandt, MS, MPH, RN, CRNP received
the top award in the Community Outreach category from the Maryland Daily Record’s Health Care Heroes program for their leadership of the Birth Companions Program.
 
Lori Edwards, MPH, BSN, APRN, BC received an award for Outstanding Faculty Community Service from the Student Outreach Resource Center.

Phyllis Sharps, PhD, RN, CNE, FAAN was honored as an “Emerging Leader” at the Associated Black Charities’ Annual Fundraising Gala. Sharps has been named to the Institute of Medicine committee to study “Qualifications of Professionals Providing Mental Health Counseling Services under TRICARE.” 

Health Systems & Outcomes Faculty
Patricia Abbott, PhD, RN, BC, FAAN, FACMI and colleagues have launched Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal (KM&EL), an international open source online journal.
 
Cheryl Dennison, PhD, RN, ANP received a $451,000 research project grant (R21) from the National Institute of Nursing Research to evaluate a nurse-led heart failure care transition intervention for African Americans.
 
Dean Martha Hill, PhD, RN, FAAN was named one of Maryland’s 2009 Top 100 Women by the Daily Record. This distinction is given to women who demonstrate leadership, community service, and mentoring. 
 
Kathi White, PhD, RN, CNAA, BC along with JHH nurse Sandra Dearholt, and DNP student Stephanie Poe, received the 2009 Nursing Publication Award from the Johns Hopkins Department of Nursing for Educational Strategies to Develop Evidence-Based Practice Mentors.

Staff
Research assistant Brandon Johnson has been accepted to the Master in Health Science program at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.
 
Mary O’Rourke, director of admissions and student services, received a master of science in counseling from the Johns Hopkins University School of Education.
 
hermesMegan Solinger, admissions officer, received a master of health science degree from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.
 
The Marketing and Communications office has received two Hermes Creative Awards from the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals: a platinum for Johns Hopkins Nursing and an Honorable Mention for an advertisement for the Forensic Nursing certificate program. The office was also awarded bronze in the Magazine Advertising/Single category (Forensic Nursing ad) from the Admissions Marketing Report 24th Annual Admissions Advertising Awards. 

Students
MSN student Kelly Caslin received the 2009 Linda Arenth Award for Innovation in Service Excellence from the JHH Department of Nursing for Frequent Vitals: Turning Press Ganey Data into Results.
 
Meghan Greeley received a School of Nursing Student Award from the Student Outreach Resource Center.
 
MSN/MPH students Sarah Hoffman and Kristen Jadelrab were inducted into Delta Omega, the honorary society for graduate studies in public health.
 
Ronald Langlotz, MSN ’09, received the 2009 Nursing Excellence Award from the JHH Department of Nursing for Implementation of Pediatric IV Response Team in Radiology. 
 
Kelsey Oveson ’09 received the 2009 Shirley Sohmer Award from the JHH Department of Nursing for her research in “Determination of Most Appropriate Diet in Leukemia Patients Receiving AcD-Ac Consolidation Chemotherapy.” 
 
Callie Simkoff ’09 and Kathy Whitlow ’09 received a Hopkins Alumni Association grant for their project “Eating Fine in ’09,” to meet with WIC clients to discuss nutritional health issues such as anemia and childhood obesity. 
 
Summer Venable, MSN/MPH candidate, was awarded a $5000 grant from the Hopkins Fogerty Global Framework Program to study women survivors of violence in DRC. 
 
Nine students from the accelerated class of 2009 will do their Transitions Practicum internationally: Lindsay DeCarlo, Mary Plumb, Lindsay Randall, and Katherine Woodward, Tawam Hospital, United Arab Emirates; Hugh Baxter and Jessica Plocher, Beijing United Family Hospital and Clinic, China; and Allison Burg, Elizabeth Crisostomo, and Lauren Hunt, Tan Tock Seng, Singapore. 
 
Approximately 30 students received special awards and recognition at the 2009 graduation ceremonies.  Read more about their accomplishments at www.nursing.jhu.edu/graduation/studentawards.

A Hopkins Nursing Hero
It was late on Tuesday evening, May 12th, when accelerated student Jessica Hancock ’09 heard a loud promotionscrash. Arriving before the emergency crews, she assisted the car crash victims until help arrived. “It’s not too big of a deal, anyone would have done this,” Hancock said. Maryland’s ABC affiliate Channel 2 called Hancock “a hero.”

Four Faculty Promoted
Faculty members (left to right) Hae-Ra Han, PhD, RN; Cheryl Dennison, PhD, RN, ANP; Patti Abbott, PhD, RN, BC, FAAN, FACMI; and Jo Walrath, PhD, MS, RN have been promoted to associate professor.

Faculty Publications Online
Check out the latest list of journal articles, book chapters, and books written by Hopkins nursing faculty at www.nursing.jhu.edu/academics/faculty/pubs/.

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